Goodies

 

A Letter to the Pastor and Elders of Shorter Community AME Church

As everyone struggles to come to grips with the horror of the tragic massacre at Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, one local lawmaker from Colorado decided he couldn't just sit by and do nothing. He had to fight back against the despair with a message of togetherness and positivity.

Senator Johnston got up in the middle of the night and wrote a letter to the pastor and elders of Shorter Community AME Church, a Denver congregation affiliated with the church in South Carolina. Johnston drove to the church and taped the letter to the door, so they would see it first thing when they got in the morning.
As it turns out, he didn't even have to wait that long. The pastor, Dr. Timothy Tyler, was so grief-stricken he couldn't sleep either, and saw Johnston's post on Facebook. He drove over to the church to get the letter.

“It touched my heart so greatly," he told The Denver Post.Here's Johnston's Facebook post, including the full text of the letter, as well as his message to anybody reading it:

Dear Pastor Tyler and the Elders of Shorter AME church,

My heart breaks for those children of God that we lost in your sister church in South Carolina tonight. On a night when old, devastating patterns of racial injustice return like childhood nightmares, it seemed the best thing to do was to get out of my bed and drive over here to make sure this note was the first thing you saw when you walked in the church tomorrow. This white man is driving over to this AME church to tell you how deeply grateful I am that the leaders of your church have helped build this city, and how honored I am that the ancestors of this church have helped build this great country.

For centuries your church has stood for the unconditional love, unfettered hope, and relentless forgiveness that define the American spirit. I want you to know I stand arm in arm with you today in your grief. I refuse to let one deranged man speak for me, and I also refuse to stay silent after his abomination. I drove over just to remind you and remind myself of the words from one of America’s greatest preachers and one of the Lord’s greatest prophets who said that “Hate can not drive out hate, only love can do that.”

With that truth in mind, in the wake of tonight’s heartless stabs of hatred, I drove here to reaffirm the overwhelming supremacy of love. And to stand with millions of other white men who are proud to call you brothers and sisters, and who feel compelled now to right the wrongs of generations past by ensuring that these lost loved ones you will not grieve alone, this hollow hatred you will not face alone, and this righteous justice you will not seek alone.

Sincerely,
Mike Johnston


Mike Johnston

As a white man I have never been called on to be an ambassador for my race. I was never the only person who looked like me in a college seminar when the room uncomfortably waited for me to speak up on behalf of my people, I have never been the one at the cocktail party confused for “the help.” And when America met Timothy McVeigh or Ted Kascinzki or Dylan Klebold I never for a minute worried that their illness said something about me.

Tonight is different. When a white man walks into a church full of black folks deep in prayer at one of the nations historic AME churches and begins shooting, it has the catastrophic power to reignite a racial stereotype centuries in the healing: the seared image of white man as racial predator. I imagine that if I drove through the parking lot of any AME church tomorrow morning I would inspire the locking of car doors, holding your children a little tighter, faces paralyzed with fear, and for good reason. That was why I couldn’t wait until tomorrow. The history is too long and the hurt is too raw.

As a white American I think we should make a point today to make a small but powerful statement that today we all stand together: and do it by stopping by any AME church in your community and perform a quiet act of service and leave a humble note of thanks. Whether you can sweep a walkway or pull some weeds or collate a bulletin, or ask if you can help and offer a hug and before you go, leave a note on the front door letting them know that you care. By Sunday morning America could blanket these churches with such overwhelming expressions of love that no one could walk through the doors of an AME church without feeling a flood of love and support from white men whose names they don’t know, whose faces they can’t place, but whose love they can’t ignore.

 

Big Dogs -- Little People

You got to love these! Makes me want to go and buy a puppy!

From Christa Williams

 

A FREE ONLINE EVENT - Summer of Peace

June 13 – September 21, 2015

Join 75+ of the world’s top peacebuilders, social change agents, Indigenous elders, political leaders, scientists and spiritual mentors – all offering inspiration, skills training and practical solutions YOU can apply in your daily life, relationships, community and the world.

Read about the Summer of Peace here.

 

(Back)

 

 

Love Offerings and Tithes Appreciated
Send to seharrill@gmail.com

View Alphabetical Article List from InnerWords Messenger

Click for FREE SUBSCRIPTION

View Back Issues

Tell A Friend

Innerworks Publishing         Site Credits

E-mail your articles, questions or humor to:
 Suzanne@InnerWorksPublishing.Com

Copyright 2003-2017 Innerworks Publishing -- All Rights Reserved